Apple’s best defense against the FBI is the one it can’t share publicly

WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 23:  The official seal of the Federal Bureau of Investigation is seen on an iPhone's camera screen outside the J. Edgar Hoover headquarters February 23, 2016 in Washington, DC. Last week a federal judge ordered Apple to write software that would allow law enforcement agencies investigating the December 2, 2015 terrorist attack in San Bernardino, California, to hack into one of the attacker's iPhone. Apple is fighting the order, saying it would create a way for hackers, foreign governments, and other nefarious groups to invade its customers' privacy.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) With Apple vowing to resist the FBI’s demands for an iPhone backdoor in the San Bernardino case all the way to the Supreme Court, many people assume the company is motivated purely out of principle and concern for their customers. No doubt these are key reasons for Apple’s stand, and I have great admiration for Tim Cook’s leadership on this matter. Read More
Apple – TechCrunch