Apple will (finally) allow you repair your iPhone, but does it go far enough? | Lifestyle

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Consumers and tech nerds have become accustomed to obsessing on every new product release from Apple. But this week the company made an announcement that may have a bigger impact on owners of its iPhones and other devices than another sleek gadget.

For the first time since the company became a mass merchandiser — let’s say since 1984 — Apple will allow consumers to perform the most common repairs on its iPhones, namely screen and battery replacements.

The change in the company’s long-standing policy of forcing its device owners to go through its network of authorized repair shops or through the company itself sent shock waves through the right-to-repair community, which has fixated on Apple as its most influential foe.

“It’s incredibly significant as a reversal of its policy,” says Nathan Proctor, director of the right-to-repair campaign at the U.S. Public Interest Research Group. “It’s more evidence that right-to-repair can change the direction of these big companies.”

Apple has been in the crosshairs of right-to-repair campaigners for several reasons. One is that its products — not only iPhones, but iPads and Mac computers — have been designed in ways that seem deliberately to discourage consumer repairs; its laptops are assembled with screws requiring special screwdrivers, and come with parts such as memory cards and batteries glued in place in ways that make them hard to remove without damaging other parts.

The company has kept a vise grip on third-party repair shops by limiting access to parts, tools and diagnostic software to authorized technicians specially certified by the company. While it broadened some access to independent repair providers in 2019, it did so under terms that many found burdensome.

Device owners who tried to replace easily accessible parts, such as cracked screens, even with parts cannibalized from other Apple products, found that they weren’t fully functional, thanks to Apple software that detected the replacements.

Apple’s announcement Wednesday introduced what it called Self Service Repair, which will give consumers access to Apple parts and tools. The program will start early next year with…

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Apple Self Service Repair probably won’t extend iPhone life

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Consumer Intelligence Research Partners (CIRP) has released analysis of the results from its research on Apple for the four quarters ending September 2021. After Apple announced its new Self Service Repair program, CIRP analyzed the condition of old iPhones among new iPhone buyers.

The research group finds almost all phones have a useable display (Chart 1) and most phones have a useable battery (Chart 2).

“Based on what consumers say about the condition of the old iPhones they are retiring, it seems that relatively few owners would use the Self Service Repair program to postpone their next iPhone purchase,” said Josh Lowitz, CIRP partner and co-founder. “Yesterday Apple announced it will now sell repair kits, including parts and tools, to replace iPhone batteries and displays. We looked at the data on condition of the old iPhone of new iPhone buyers in the last 12 months. Clearly, Apple’s ongoing efforts to improve display durability and battery quality have paid off, even though consumers continue to complain, especially about battery life. Based on what consumers say about the condition of their old iPhones, most new iPhone buyers have more than adequately useable phones.”

Mike Levin, CIRP partner and co-founder, adds: “It seems battery life affects consumers more than screen condition. Fourteen percent of iPhone buyers reported needing to charge a battery in their old iPhone every few hours. Only 6% of iPhone buyers said they had a cracked screen that made the old phone unusable, while another 12% had a cracked screen that was still useable. Of course, buyers have many reasons for upgrading from an old iPhone, including processor performance or storage capacity. So, at best a small fraction of buyers are likely to postpone a new iPhone purchase by repairing an old phone through the Self Service Repair program.”

CIRP bases its findings on its survey of 2,000 US Apple customers that purchased an iPhone, iPad, Mac computer, or Apple Watch in the October 2020-September 2021 period. 


Article provided with permission from AppleWorld.Today

Source…


Apple Self Service Repair probably won’t extend iPhone life


Consumer Intelligence Research Partners (CIRP) has released analysis of the results from its research on Apple for the four quarters ending September 2021. After Apple announced its new Self Service Repair program, CIRP analyzed the condition of old iPhones among new iPhone buyers.

The research group finds almost all phones have a useable display (Chart 1) and most phones have a useable battery (Chart 2).

“Based on what consumers say about the condition of the old iPhones they are retiring, it seems that relatively few owners would use the Self Service Repair program to postpone their next iPhone purchase,” said Josh Lowitz, CIRP partner and co-founder. “Yesterday Apple announced it will now sell repair kits, including parts and tools, to replace iPhone batteries and displays. We looked at the data on condition of the old iPhone of new iPhone buyers in the last 12 months. Clearly, Apple’s ongoing efforts to improve display durability and battery quality have paid off, even though consumers continue to complain, especially about battery life. Based on what consumers say about the condition of their old iPhones, most new iPhone buyers have more than adequately useable phones.”

Mike Levin, CIRP partner and co-founder, adds: “It seems battery life affects consumers more than screen condition. Fourteen percent of iPhone buyers reported needing to charge a battery in their old iPhone every few hours. Only 6% of iPhone buyers said they had a cracked screen that made the old phone unusable, while another 12% had a cracked screen that was still useable. Of course, buyers have many reasons for upgrading from an old iPhone, including processor performance or storage capacity. So, at best a small fraction of buyers are likely to postpone a new iPhone purchase by repairing an old phone through the Self Service Repair program.”

CIRP bases its findings on its survey of 2,000 US Apple customers that purchased an iPhone, iPad, Mac computer, or Apple Watch in the October 2020-September 2021 period. 


Article provided with permission from AppleWorld.Today

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Apple’s new self-service repair program: What it means for you and your Apple devices


samsung-s7-broken-phone.jpg

Right to repair just might change the way we all look at products we break. Here’s what you need to know. 


Josh Miller/CNET

Apple said it will soon let you repair your iPhone at home. Advocates have pushed for companies like Apple to ease restrictions around letting consumers repair their own devices. In July, the Federal Trade Commission agreed on new rules that prevent companies from limiting customers from repairing their own products or having repairs done at a third-party shops. An executive order this summer issued by President Joe Biden and a policy statement from the Federal Trade Commission have placed pressure on tech companies to revisit their repair policies.

Biden’s executive order came after years of debate by advocates calling for “right to repair,” an initiative that in theory would force companies ranging from phone-makers, manufacturers of cars and washing machines to producers of pricey farm equipment and medical devices to offer the diagnostic tools and documentation they use to fix products when they break. This would allow everyday people to either fix the product themselves or go to a third-party repair shop, rather than rely on “official” authorized repair centers, which are often an expensive option.

Below are common questions about the concept of right to repair, what it means for you and what the government is doing to make right to repair a reality.  (This story has been updated with new information.)


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Michael Hiltzik: At long last, Apple will let you repair your iPhone, but it didn’t go far enough | Nation


Consumers and tech nerds have become accustomed to obsessing on every new product release from Apple. But this week the company made an announcement that may have a bigger impact on owners of its iPhones and other devices than another sleek gadget.

For the first time since the company became a mass merchandiser — let’s say since 1984 — Apple will allow consumers to perform the most common repairs on its iPhones, namely screen and battery replacements.

The change in the company’s long-standing policy of forcing its device owners to go through its network of authorized repair shops or through the company itself sent shock waves through the right-to-repair community, which has fixated on Apple as its most influential foe.

“It’s incredibly significant as a reversal of its policy,” says Nathan Proctor, director of the right-to-repair campaign at the U.S. Public Interest Research Group. “It’s more evidence that right-to-repair can change the direction of these big companies.”

Apple has been in the crosshairs of right-to-repair campaigners for several reasons. One is that its products — not only iPhones, but iPads and Mac computers — have been designed in ways that seem deliberately to discourage consumer repairs; its laptops are assembled with screws requiring special screwdrivers, and come with parts such as memory cards and batteries glued in place in ways that make them hard to remove without damaging other parts.

The company has kept a vise grip on third-party repair shops by limiting access to parts, tools and diagnostic software to authorized technicians specially certified by the company. While it broadened some access to independent repair providers in 2019, it did so under terms that many found burdensome.

Device owners who tried to replace easily accessible parts, such as cracked screens, even with parts cannibalized from other Apple products, found that they weren’t fully functional, thanks to Apple software that detected the replacements.

Apple’s announcement Wednesday introduced what it called Self Service Repair, which will give consumers access to Apple parts and tools. The program will start early next year with display, battery and…

Source…