Facebook and Apple’s privacy battle is about how we interact with tech


  • Apple’s latest effort to improve user privacy on its devices, known as App Tracking Transparency (ATT), is a part of iOS 14 and could be implemented by early 2021.
  • This change, which requires apps to obtain permission before tracking and collecting user data for the purpose of advertising, will have a major impact on advertisers.
  • Facebook said in a statement to Business Insider that Apple’s trying to “self-preference their own data collection while making it nearly impossible for their competitors to use the same data.”
  • Tech columnist Jason Aten argues that the tech giants butting heads is about more than just ads — it’s about allowing users to choose between giving up their data for more “personalized experiences” and maintaining their privacy.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Apple and Facebook have very different ideas about how you use and interact with technology. Those differences have never been more clear than the current tension between the two companies over Apple’s decision to require apps to obtain permission before tracking and collecting user data for the purpose of advertising. 

You can argue over which of the two companies provides a better experience for users, but ultimately, you can’t have what Facebook calls “personalized experiences” and still maintain the level of user privacy that Apple says is its core value. You only get one by giving up at least part of the other. 

Apple’s latest effort to improve user privacy on its devices, known as App Tracking Transparency (ATT), is a part of iOS 14 — and it has very real implications for advertisers. That explains why Facebook is concerned. As the second largest advertising platform in the world, Facebook has said that ATT could “render Audience Network so ineffective on iOS 14 that it may not make sense to offer it on iOS 14.”

Facebook’s Audience Network is the part of the company’s advertising business that allows businesses to place ads in third-party apps, mostly for games. It’s a small part of Facebook’s advertising business, but it still highlights the effect Apple’s change could have on advertisers and the apps and websites that depend on…

Source…