Mosyle leads the rise of a new generation of Apple endpoint software

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Apple’s growth in the enterprise over the last two decades has been an impressive turnaround when you consider how entrenched Microsoft was in desktop computing for the early part of the 2000s. Did enterprise IT managers love Windows XP, Windows 7, etc.? 

They loved the seamless management a complete solution of Windows Server, Microsoft Exchange, Microsoft Office, and Windows brought to their work-life.

Now companies leveraging Apple devices are gaining access to a next generation of products that bring this concept to a new level, making the management and security of Apple devices a fully unified and automated experience that can’t be matched when using any other devices. 

At the forefront of this movement is Mosyle. Over the past five years, the company grew from a new Apple MDM provider to a leader in the market. Mosyle is responsible for several innovations that have become table stakes for other vendors in the Apple MDM space.

Now, Mosyle is innovating again and introducing the concept of Apple Unified Platform. 

The idea for Mosyle’s Apple Unified Platform is clear. It makes perfect sense when you hear it for the first time: integrating five critical security and management applications into a single Apple-only platform.  

Still, it completely changes how B2B companies providing endpoint solutions position themselves.

Until now, companies usually position themselves on one of the traditional “Unified” categories, such as “Unified Endpoint Management” or “Unified Endpoint Security.” Those categories are well known for their quadrants and industry recognition.

The angle for these traditional B2B market segments is the specialization of an application category (e.g., mobile device management) and the generalization of the platform (macOS, iOS, Android, Windows, Linux and others).

So, a vendor in the traditional Unified Endpoint Management market would provide MDM functionality for all platforms. A customer would then need several unified solutions to cover their devices’ needs, as security, identity, patch management and others.

The problem with that? Lack of specialization and increased complexity.

The growing differences between operating…

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